On SEND reforms, Personal Budgets and choice and control

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Kind mit fußballThis past year has been a boon time for the education conference sector, with the SEND Reforms driving a seemingly endless yet necessary round of symposiums, national conferences and regional events.

I have been fortunate to be asked to speak at several regional SEN Leader conferences on the theme of Personal Budgets. It is not a favourite topic within the SEND Reforms, appearing more like the least favourite cousin who has come to stay the duration, with no end date in sight. I can quite see why it has been less favoured by the SEND pathfinders than other areas of the reforms – Education, Health and Care Plans, or Transition to Adulthood. Yet as I’ve absorbed myself in the work of the pathfinders and small scale studies, I have become more enamoured of the process and the potential it brings for many parents, carers, children and young people.

A personal budget is an amount of money identified by the local authority to deliver all or some of the provision set out in an Education, Health and Care Plan. By having a say in the way this budget is used, a parent or young person can control elements of their support.” (Draft SEN Code of Practice: Section 7.2)

Yet there are tensions within this new found freedom. It seems that in order for one group – parents and young people – to have more control, another must relinquish that control – schools, SENCos, early years settings and a host of education professionals. Already that tension presents itself in the many grumbles of discontent I’ve heard from practitioners, who see parents demanding x, y and z, as the immediate source of their problem. In a few cases, I’ve had requests for advice where parents and schools are at tribunal level over personal budgets and how money should be allocated. Ironic, when one considers that the a key argument for the SEND reforms was to avoid the adversarial nature of SEND practice and provision.

Here is a link to the full presentation for the SEN Leader Update conferences recently in London, Manchester and Birmingham (February and March 2014)-

SEND Reforms – Personal Budgets – Heather Stack March 2014

Here are some key themes from my presentation –

Key Challenges ahead

  1. Implementing the lessons (rather conservative and modest though they may be) of the SEND pathfinders
  2. Understanding local perceptions and strength of feeling towards the reforms and personal budgets
  3. Strengthening the role of key workers, advocates and independent supporters
  4. Gaining the involvement of children and young people in their EHC plans
  5. Understanding and knowing the diversity and breadth of provision from all sectors within a locality
  6. SEND providers having a realistic costing of service and provision that is shared with stakeholders

Key Opportunities ahead –

  1. An opportunity for schools, parents and young people to explore a greater breadth of provision and services than previously
  2. Incorporating the knowledge gained from One Page Profiles can give a new perspective on needs, support and provision
  3. Giving parents and young people a real say in the choices they can make about support is enpowering for all and far more likely to elicit partnership working between home and school
  4. Considering the needs of the child 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, rather than between the hours of 9am and 3pm, should ensure that social, leisure, sporting and creative activities become a part of the picture of a holistic support programme
  5. Enabling parents and young people to take an active part in determing support choices will take away the pressure from school SEN staff who may otherwise be imposing support interventions that are actively resisted by the child and the family
  6. An opportunity for local authorities to consider all the provision within their locality, whether from the private, public or third sector, as an asset, and not a threat
  7. A chance for specialist providers to collaborate to create flexible and timely services that are delivered at the point of need, and not when services become available.

Riding for the disabled

I will continue my theme in my next post, on the need to consider support needs 24/7 and not just 9am – 3pm. Once we liberate ourselves from the constraints of the school day, and think about what short and long term outcomes we are trying to achieve, the world really is our oyster.

For some reason, it is hard to fathom, the glorious words of Lewis Carroll’s The Lobster Quadrille come to mind.

Will you walk a little faster?” said a whiting to a snail,
There’s a porpoise close behind us, and he’s treading on my tail.
See how eagerly the lobsters and the turtles all advance!
They are waiting on the shingle — will you come and join the dance?
Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, will you join the dance?
Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, won’t you join the dance?

Will you, won’t you, will you, won’t you, won’t you join the dance?

 

 

 

 

 

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